Ninety-Two Years of Style

On Saturday, April 5th, a curated selection of Iris Apfel’s vast furniture, vintage, textile and jewelry collection will go on sale at One Kings Lane, the rapidly growing e-tailer for the modern, one-stop home decorator. After years of conversations with the 92-year old style icon, they finally convinced her to delve into her storage rooms and part with some of her things, nearly eight hundred to be exact. The sale will be chaptered into five categories: Furniture/Lighting, Jewelry, Art & Wall Decoration, Decorative Accessories & Tabletop, and Textiles & Rugs and will run for at least seven days.

In an interview with ElleDecor.com Iris Apfel speaks out about being chic, the boring formula of decorating, and why one should never succumb to trends!

Iris Apfel: I do know what I would look for and it’s typically not what most people are attracted to. Look for what pleases you. If you buy something and you’re not comfortable with wearing it or having it out, then it’s not for you. I always tell everybody, being well dressed or having your home well decorated is a choice. If you have to go through too much stress or aggravation or too much this or that… then, forget it! It’s better to be happy than to be chic. You just need to relax. There are no fashion police that are going to carry you away!

ED: When One Kings Lane cleared your warehouses, did you come across stuff you forgot you even owned?

IA: Absolutely! There were a lot of things I had forgotten. You can’t remember everything! Some things I had never even unpacked!

ED: What piece of furniture would you never part with?

IA: A number of things! There are a few things I’m letting go of that were very difficult. However, I’m taking a number of pieces down to my house in Palm Beach—I can’t fit anything else into my Park Avenue place.

ED: Does your husband enjoy hunting for unique objects as much as you do?

IA: We’ve been married 66 years—it’s a long time! At the beginning, when we were first married, he wanted everything new. He would act like a spoiled brat when I passed an antique shop. He would say, “I don’t want to go in! I don’t want anyone else’s old troubles!” But, once we got established he started to love it.

ED: If your friends were shopping the sale, what would you advise them to look out for?

IA: Well, it depends what the friend wanted and what they needed. There are a number of things that are very unusual and ridiculously priced I could sell them on!

ED: You have your hands in so many different projects, do you just like staying busy?

IA: Some days I’m frantic! Like today, I was supposed to give the people from MAC Cosmetics a quote but then my phone went dead… so I stole my husband’s, called them back with no luck and now they’re calling me back and I’m in the middle of a movie shoot!

ED: It sounds like you need an assistant! Did you ever think you’d be busier than ever in your nineties?

IA: I never wanted to stop working, but I never dreamt of being a geriatric starlet! Sometimes I grumble, but I thank god every night that I am 92-and-a-half and I am asked to do so many things. Getting shot for magazine covers and all kinds of stuff! It’s very exciting. I have been on the cover of every European publication you can think of, all these blogs and television shows too. It’s cuckoo!

ED: Do you still follow interior designers or do you just blaze your own path?

IA: I haven’t been interested in an interior designer in a long, long time. Everything looks the same—if I could tell you the truth! I can’t say that I don’t see new pretty things here and there, but mostly it’s all boring as far as I am concerned. You can’t tell who lives in any of these apartments. There like divine hotel suites.

ED: Too modern or too stark?

They’re just all the same. It’s like a formula and I don’t like that.

ED: You’ve worked in both fashion and interior design. What are you most passionate about?

IA: Fashion and interior design are one in the same.

ED: You would say you definitely don’t follow trends?

IA: Things are either good or they’re not. They either suit you or they don’t. Some years all the colors and cuts are wonderful, other years they’re ridiculous. I never buy what someone says is “in” or a “must-have.” I buy what makes me happy.

ED: What exactly does it take to be chic?

IA: It’s a big discussion… To sum it up, unfortunately, most people are not chic. You have to know who you are and you have to be comfortable with it. You just have to do it.

ED: How can people tap into their inner uniqueness?

IA: Self-exploration is very painful, but unless you do that you will never know who you are and who you want to be. People want all the results without doing any work. You don’t find out who you are unless you work at it.

Head shot photo by Ryan Dixon for One Kings Lane. Product shots by One Kings Lane.

April 3, 2014

Leave a Comment

7 Responses to “Ninety-Two Years of Style”

  1. avatar
    Hannah - Reply

    Just what I needed to hear today- “Self exploration is very painful, but unless you do that you will never know who you are and who you want to be.” Thank you for your beautiful tales Natalie.

  2. avatar
    sarafina - Reply

    She beholds each and every mantra for which I prescribe….a daring woman who oversteps the constraints of our world. Thank you, Joos, for sharing her. Kusjes!

  3. avatar

    Wow, does this interview ever end on a wise note. Exploring one’s personal style may appear like a vain endeavor, but some people simply have to follow the aesthetic truth that’s within them. It’s great to hear someone I admire acknowledge the growing pains of that process. Thanks so much for sharing!

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  4. avatar
    Arlene Guerra - Reply

    Iris is amazing she is not all about show, but can back up her flamboyant style with a well curated sensibility. I love that she encourages individuality in decorating and in life. Thank you Coveteur for sharing this interview.

  5. avatar
    Arlene Guerra - Reply

    Iris is amazing she is not all about show, but can back up her flamboyant style with a well curated sensibility. I love that she encourages individuality in decorating and in life. Thank you Terms of Endearment for sharing this interview.

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